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October 17, 2012

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torbjorn appehl

Oh, I will put Erik to translate the text as I'm the boss now :-). you were all very apprecited as speakers, see you in Sweden next year!

BobL

That approach sounds like my experience out of college. I accepted a job offer from a small "midrange" (okay, S/32 and S/34) consulting firm near Chicago. The company probably had about 30 current employees at the time, and they had a trainer teach the new college grads--about 8 of us or so--the fundamentals of RPG III (or was it RPG II??). (At the time I remarked that it looked a lot like assembly code, being column oriented and not even having control structures like IF or DO!)

They counted on hiring smart people who would make good consultants (not just programmers) and teaching them the technical knowledge they needed.

It worked out pretty well, as employees from that company (PCR, or Professional Computer Resources) went on to found companies like SSA, Silvon, Advanced Systems Concepts, Systems Start-Up, and others, or to hold significant roles at places like CA, Oracle, Synon, and more.

Nathan Andelin

I followed the link titled "execellent magazine" and noticed the picture with the caption "Scott Klemens får pris", which I assumed meant Scott Klement for President. However Google translated it to "Scott Clement awarded prize". It's pretty impressive how some people get around. It's good to hear about other companies training new RPG recruits, not just me.

Greg Helton

Something similar worked at Countrywide Mortgage in 1999 but the students were recruited from the business side. All but one succeeded in the class. The graduates all became very good RPG programmers. About 20 RPG programmers went through a similar class and were taught Java. It turned out that they didn't need 20 Java programmers though.

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