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December 18, 2012

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Scott Klement

That Google60 link totally rocks!

Help400

We are wishing you all a wonderful holiday season, and looking forward to meet again with you in the new year !!

The Xmas spirit comes to our Community... http://ibm.co/WGttKV

:) Un cordial saludo desde Barcelona

Dean Hall

I’m wondering if the New and Improved Windows 8 is going to be one of those sending the naughty email to their loyal customers. I was on the “Purchaser of IBM PC’s” web site and saw a note that had something to do with 20% discount on subscription fee . . . for the life of me, I cannot find that web page again nor can I find anything else on it. But, I can upgrade my old laptop for $40.00! Hum. . I think MS had talked about this once before on Win7 or something. . .!

Dan Devoe

I can't believe that I didn't see that Google60 before! That made me year! :-)

If the world doesn't end tomorrow (December 21) - as predicted - have a safe & happy Holiday season! :-)

Murray Crofskey

Merry Christmas and Happy holidays...
All the best from sunny New Zealand

Cheers Murray

Greg Helton

Google60 got me thinking about the design of Twitter/400, an app (exercise) that has crossed my mind. What would "the best" design of an RPG green-screen app that provides twitter-like messaging for users of a IBM i? My app would be limited to a few features but be (hopefully) designed so additional features could be added later. Primary features would be (1) allow a user to select who's messages he sees, omitting others messages from his screen, (2) allow a user to create a 140 char message and (3) app will send an update to user's screen when a new message is available (QMHSNDPM and/or FRCDTA may be required). And, a 4th design requirement is design to minimize DB IO.

For the 4th design requirement, the idea is that when a user refreshes his screen in response to a message displayed on his screen that "more tweets are available" (or for any other reason), the application should not need to access the DB to retrieve the info that is already on his screen.

I've tried to minimize the scope of this application so that it will be easy to discuss and get the primary features right. I believe that green-screen app design is still important even in the web era and it is something we can all benefit from. Minimizing DB IO is an important criteria in new app development in some shops. Beyond the requirement for minimal IO, the DB design may be non-trivial. Using data storage other than the relational DB is an option.

Beyond the scope of our requirements for this exercise are including another networked IBM i, any admin features, searching one's tweets, retweeting, direct (private) tweets or accessing the real Twitter. The user's AS400 id will be the id used in this app.

I hope this idea has provided food for thought.

Jon and Susan, I've enjoyed reading your blog and your articles in 2012. Keep up the good work!

Greg

Leif Guldbrand

>That Google60 link totally rocks!

Wow, this is stuf from the past. Checked it (from memory) and no errors found :-)

Except.. I don't remember the ">>" punch combinations.

Strange... one can remember things back in the '60 - but not all PW's of today =:-)

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